Twitter, Storytelling and the Rugby World Cup

Social Media

Twitter, Storytelling and the Rugby World Cup

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By Sociabble

In case you haven’t heard, one of the world’s greatest sporting spectacles is upon us: the Rugby World Cup. Like all high profile events, the RWC has already driven a huge amount of activity across social media; and on Twitter in particular.

So much so, in fact, that Twitter has published an infographic detailing seven key statistics about how rugby affects user activity and brand-oriented conversations on the platform. The infographic presents research, conducted for Twitter by @MESHExperience, which highlights the effect that good brand-related rugby content and “building a strong emotional connection” can have on Twitter users.

According to the research, Twitter users are 1.6 times more likely to talk about a brand with friends and family after seeing rugby-focused brand content. This reflects the fact that online consumers are far more likely to engage with brand content that ties in with events they are following and – as is often the case in sport – are emotionally invested in.

And of course, this links back to the point about “building a strong emotional connection”. More often than not, content that trends during events such as the Rugby World Cup is focused not on products; but rather on stories users can relate to and are therefore more likely to share.

 

 

As far as the #RWC2015 is concerned, notable examples include Air New Zealand’s “Men In Black Safety Defenders” safety video and Samsung UK’s “School of Rugby” series (it’s also worth noting that both are videos – the most engaging form of social media content).

And how’s this for a stat? No fewer than 55% of active monthly Twitter users will watch the #RWC2015 on TV or online. So getting in on the action and sharing rugby-oriented content gives marketers a rather large audience to engage with; and remember, content that focuses on stories as opposed to products.

Discover the infographic on the Twitter blog.

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